Opening Week for a Moore Method Course: Getting Comfortable

I am teaching iteration number ten of my Modified Moore Method Euclidean Geometry course. This semester I am making an effort to refocus on the basics: managing and mentoring the students as much as I can.

At this point, my theorem sequence is very stable. (I am no longer surprised much by what happens in this course.) This allows me to work on the other aspects of the course. I feel like I have started to let some important things go in the last year or so, and now I want to sharpen up. What has been lacking? I don’t think I have kept on top of the students to keep them engaged as well as I might. And I don’t think I have done a good job selling the method of instruction, either.

So, I was much more deliberate about introducing myself to each of my sixteen students on the first day. I have been very explicit about my expectations and my willingness to help them meet those expectations (which are rather high). And I will be making a conscious effort to check in with as many students as possible each day.

The first week was a rousing success, I think. Each day we got at least one theorem. We have already set the expectation for what counts as an argument. (Well, surely, there is still some work to be done.) The class has made two conjectures. We took some time to discuss some basic points of what acceptable writing will look like. I even successfully navigated our first potential difficult situation and found something positive in it. All in all, I am feeling pretty good about this.

I think our next test comes when we have to finish conjecture 1.1. They haven’t addressed the second statement in that, yet.

And sometime next week I will have to steal ten minutes to talk with them about my Standards Based Assessment experiment for the term.

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2 thoughts on “Opening Week for a Moore Method Course: Getting Comfortable

  1. Sure. The basic idea is that the instructor designs a carefully scripted set of problems for the students to solve. This includes questions to answer, definitions to unpack, conjectures to prove or disprove, etc.
    Class runs by the students making presentations and “arguing” over correctness of the demonstrations given. The instructor tries only to manage class and let the students exercise independent thought.

    You can find a lot more information under the “Inquiry-Based Learning” Tab.

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